Rejuvenating conifer hedges

 Thuja and yew hedges. The rejuvenation method, as described above, is not suitable for conifers, since they have very few dormant buds. Thujas and yews are an exception, since they respond well to sever cutting back. Old plants should be reduced by half, and lateral branches should be shortened by half or a third, so as to shape the hedge into a sloping form. Dead branches should be removed. The best time to rejuvenate conifers is summer, from the beginning of June to midsummer. You could also prune in the second half of summer to early winter, however, this period is less favorable. The rejuvenated plants should be looked after, fertilized, and watered in a prolonged dry spell.

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In the shadow

Is your garden overshadowed by a tall fence, old trees, or neighbouring buildings? Does it enjoy only a couple of hours of sunshine at most? If so, then maybe it is time for you to consider growing hostas (Hosta). Hostas have been grown in Lithuania from time immemorial. Medleys of at least 2-3 varieties of green or glaucous leaved plants flourish in most countryside gardens, including an obligatory green white-edged plant.

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Pines: pruning and training

Healthy pines, growing in a sunny location, have a shape which is characteristic of the genus. Their crowns are sparse, which is natural. Pines do not become any denser when pruned, since they have no dormant buds; they also do not respond to rejuvenating in the way that deciduous trees would. Only dry or damaged branches can be pruned out.

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